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being the guardian of religion justifying the presence and political will by resisting western as asian and that is it. what is your answer to the problems we have within the society? what is your social policy? what is your educational policy? we don't have answers. the only thing is polarization is reducing political discourse into something that is simplistic to. not only the arab world is falling into that trap but we in the west read this situation to these lengths and egypt is in danger. too many men are wearing head scarves now. the symbol is dynamic and you can laugh but i am sorry to tell you the media coverage is too often the case that we are reducing the reality of a country on symbols. how many women and how many men. what is your position on sharia, if you use the term is over. that is the reality of the simplistic discussion we have. but once again what i am saying to the muslim countries in the arab world you cannot blame the west to reduce the political discourse. this is what is happening in the muslim countries themselves. this is the problem. by going beyond us, pola
in politicized religion. as i described in chapter seven, of religious cranks ceased to be a minor public nuisance in this country, beginning in the 1970s and grew into a major element of the republican rank-and-file. pat robinson's strong showing in the 1988 iowa presidential caucuses signal the gradual merger of politics and religion in the party. unfortunately, at that time i underestimated the implications of what i was seeing. it did strike me as oddly humorous that a fundamentalist staff member in a congressional office was going to take time off to convert the heathen increase, a country overwhelmingly christian for almost 2000 years. i recall another point in the early 1990s when a different fundamentalist gop staffer said that dinosaur fossils were a hoax. as the mayor of legislative mechanic toiling away what i hope to be a similar president ecclesiastical calling, i did not get cd ideological impulses far different from mine were poised to capture the party of lincoln. if the american people polled more like iranians or nigerians and europeans are canadians on questions of evol
now. new first amendment -- congress shall make no law respecting the establishment of religion or the free exercise thereof. stay out of it and leave people alone when it comes to their religion obviously assumes religion. we knew what the revisions were. the baptist convention. they were not worshiping a pulp or something. they believed in god. i am not going to revise history to pretend i grew up in a religious environment. i was going to be a priest. i believed in god, i would be enormously angry -- i am grateful for my faith and unapologetic about it. >> one interesting sort of -- it is remarkable. started talking a little bit about how we have changed over time. nevada the nineteenth amendment and women becoming part of this effort greater arc of democratic inclusion. >> and prohibition. >> which got -- [talking over each other] >> was repealed. in general most of the amendments -- what you said before. and -- we got rid of it. >> i understand. >> host: on religion it is pretty extraordinary. of the constitution freed every american to be eligible for public office. there
or hetero jenne 80, how many languages are spoken, how many religions and the extent of the space and facilities among the religions, how are natural resources distributed, generally not a good idea for all the resources to be found only in one part of a large country and things like that. i don't want to overestimate the importance of constitutions or to say here is our constitution that has really worked because no doubt there would be examples when it didn't. let me be truly heretical and say that one of the things i like about many state constitutions and you find these especially as we move west but not only in the west, is the degree to which they allow an element of direct democracy. the united states constitution was written by people who not to put too fine a point on it were fundamentally mistrustful to their core of democracy. james madison rights very proudly in the third federalist that although the constitution is ordained we the people, that will be the last time the people speak more or less directly. otherwise they will speak exclusively through elected representa
for religion. right now as you may know, justice stevens retired two years ago as a protestant on the supreme court and we now have the supreme court of six catholics and three jews. how does that happen? in some ways you could suggest that it happens but it certainly reflects is we don't see that much anymore about the accounting by religion we still force are very aware of race and ethnicity and gender, so the fact that there are now three women on the court, you know, that says something. that's approaching a kind of normalization of the notion that the women can rise to the highest ranks in the legal profession. i think we're still waiting for more diversity in the court, and race and ethnicity. but the point i actually want to make the wingback to how the court knows what it knows is until elena kagan succeeded justice stevens two years ago she had never been a judge. she came from the dean's office at harvard law school. every member of the supreme court for the first time in our history had as the last thing on their resume a seat on the federal court of appeals, and that is astonishin
to show religion in and there is an opportunity to move certain voters. when you have an honest conversation with the hispanic community about religion and the republican mardy and democratic party and the example is i'm a democrat and latino because i believe that i believe in taking care of my fellow man and my fellow wollman and the democratic party looks at those issues how do we support the families in need and they say it makes sense to make that social of reach and support and on the republican side we look back on the issue of abortion. i think every devotee for latinos is that you are walking down the middle of the road with them when it comes to religion because of the tug of war. my mother-in-law knows what i do in terms of the democratic message being out there and supporting my president but she is a strong woman of faith and she cannot be displayed or move when it comes to issues on abortion and she told me don't call me on election day but i anderson and because she's also volunteered and has done a lot in the community coming to help the community service program
myself. every man had his dope, whether it was religion, philosophy, creed, was the chemical faint -- cocaine, morphine, anything to take the weight of reality. and so we have a hero, intelligent, captivated, a renegade with little regard for right or privilege. to him the world was equally a moral above as well as the los of the progressive area reformer frederick hero. some might be squeamish about it in the criminal cases? in the course of that 60-year career he would tailor testimony, pay off witnesses and tracy tried for a jury bribing and both times barely escaped. do not the rich and powerful bribe jurors, you would as? did not intimidate and coerce judges? to the shrink from any weapons? get in -- compassion for those the faced loss or despair or persecution. a strong emotional nature doted by his upbringing. his father was a book living freethinking of their and owner of a royal furniture shop, abolitionist with steep values of liberty and equality. compassion plays a role of a unifying theory in his chaotic universe. the bids in his other office was built by overalls. poo
religions, the sense of tranquility is highly desirable. not anarchy, it is the way of the world and a healthy individual wants to see this. he is very tough-minded on the subject and i think illuminating. and he needs to sympathize with this need for wholeness. it is painful, it helps us understand why we, ourselves, and fellow citizens were fellow human beings might be drawn to the inebriation of this. i think they behave pretty well during this limit, but i want to end by saying that i accomplished working hard and playing a little bit. it was really something, you know, he never lost his wits. and he never got so much for a single visit. he never lost his way. that is something to admire. thank you. [applause] >> anyone who would like to ask a question or make a comment, and spontaneous postulation come into my life here. please step up to the microphone and talk away. >> i was curious about what you are saying about the stoicism, did he endorse that point of view in his writing? >> figure. >> he did endorse that kind of writing. florida is generally pessimistic. he believed
results to a struggle between freedom of religion and the right of government to regulate society even when such regulations may interfere with religious doctrines because those are two points that are important here. there was a time in this country before 1965 when it was okay for a state to outlaw the use of contraceptions by married couples. several states had been for years. they were lingering on the books for years and finally the supreme court in a case called griswold versus connecticut said it was unconstitutional to prohibit married people from using contraceptions in the privacy of their bedroom. does the constitution have a provision that says government shall not prohibit married people from using contraception in their bedroom? no. it does not. it does have something called due process and with in due process the court eventually found that there was a right of privacy and for my libertarian friends in the crowd, it really means something you've been saying for years which is the government needs to get all of our lives to the extent possible and having the government re
believe the only way you can get rowdy as the religion. rand was an atheist and one of the different answers to your question as to why she's such a polarizing character, she was an atheist and a time in american life when it was not good to be an atheist. if she were alive and writing waday nobody would care but she
religion into the public sphere and above all, reverse roe v wade in the last months again to the abortion. a big part of the revolution was the arrival in washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted it to work on behalf of the agenda. word the best and brightest in your group? john roberts and samuel alito. in 1985 in a memo plotting the litigation strategy of the solicitor general's office, he wrote what can be made of this opportunity to advance the goal of bringing about the eventual overruling of roe v wade? later that year of playing for a promotion, he wrote volume particularly proud of my contributions to the recent cases in which the government argued in the supreme court to the constitution doesn't protect the right to abortion, samuel alito. but, the republican party of 1980 was not the republican party of today either and we saw that in the nomination to the supreme court. stuart unexpectedly announced his resignation, and he had made a campaign promise that jimmy carter didn't even make in the campaign. he said if i have the chance i will nomin
and end racial preferences, speed up execution, welcome religion into the public sphere, and above all, reverse roe v. wade and allow states once again to ban abortion. a big part of the reagan revolution was the arrival of washington of a group of young and committed conservative lawyers who wanted to work in that, on behalf of that agenda, who were two of the best and the brightest of that group? john roberts and samuel alito. 1970 -- in 1985, a memo at the solicitor general's office, alito wrote what can be made of this opportunity to advance the goal of bringing about the eventual overruling of roe v. wade? later that year, applying for a promotion he wrote i am particularly proud of my contribution to recent cases in which the government has argued in the supreme court that the constitution does not protect the right to abortion. samuel alito then, samuel alito now. but republican party of 1980 was not the republican party of today either, and we saw that in reagan's nominations to the supreme court. 1981, potter stewart unexpectedly announced his resignation, and reagan had made
traditions. but there is a fundamental difference between israel and extremism. islam is a great religion peacefully over a billion people in our world. it's the most extremism is a warped political ideology supported by the minority that seeks to hijack this great religion to gain respectability for the violent objectives. it is vital that we make this distinction. in turkey we see the government with fruits and islamic values but one with democratic politics and open economy and responsible attitude to supporting change in libya and syria and elsewhere in the region. i profoundly believe that the same part is open to egypt to nisha and their neighbors and we must help them take it. democracy in islam can flourish alongside one another. so let us judge governments not by their religion, but how they act and what they do and let us in the region in a space government in egypt and tunisia said their success can strengthen democracy, not undermine it. mr. president, there is no doubt that we are in the midst of profound change and that many uncertainties lie ahead. the building blocks of de
university berkeley center for religion, peace and world affairs. this is part of the millennium value symposium, which consists of a series of panels focusing on democracy in the u.s.. this is about one hour and ten minutes. >> i would like to hear from all of you and, you know, last night when we think governor romney talked about states as the laboratory of democracy while that may have been eight republican versus democrat, and it got me thinking about our mayors and what they do in the community. and so i'm going to hand the floor over to them so you can dhaka little bit about how to see the future of american politics from where you sit. >> thank you for having us and all of you for coming to this event. i do believe that the politics are local and as the mayor i've had the opportunity to witness decision making on local level that i think has implications for the state and the federal government. i will just briefly talk about my background how i first got into the position as the mayor in a small city about 40,000 people outside of springfield in the western part of massachuset
sterilization and the morning after pill because they consider to be an assault on their religion as this. when the president did not withdraw those regulations but, in fact, double down the, he awoke it giant in america called the roman catholic church. he is going to rue the day that he did that command of tell you why. there is a great myth in western storytelling. dates back to the eliot. the super hero who was asleep. you wonder where that super hero is. achilles will not come out because he is mad at the others. rage. he only comes out after he has been threatened. dealt with. and the room because the church basically left the field of politics in 1968 and has not been effectively energized in politics for 40 years. they are now back. they're led by cardinal timothy dolan. the ships up and down this country laypeople up and down this country, religious up and down this country who believe that the obama administration rightly has leveled a direct attack on their ability to be catholic. that is not going to pass unnoticed in states like ohio, michigan, pennsylvania where the catholic vote
the military people, they have a type of card you can imagine. did i ever say that religion matter? what color of the skin? are they male or female? are they muslims, christians -- nothing? imagine having that in your heart. that is what military people have. that is what your counterterrorism units have. because they are doing it every day, throwing themselves. [inaudible] i have so many patients now that i can hardly see them all. people can tell when you love them. when i was kicking out the door and swimming in the room, i left him with love. in closing, i want to leave you with an example of how i know love is missing. after i got divorced, i told myself i would never get married again. i would rather get shot three more times. i was a bachelor for a long time. god finally sent me the right one who convinced me that i could do something else with my life. i don't live in a bottle anymore. i don't have to take a ton of prescription medications anymore for pain. i have learned how to express myself besides just being on a team or having to do something illegal time. there's it is a lesson t
a security and political theory meaning that terrorism has no nation and no religion, and it is a common thread regionally and internationally, and it requires a necessity, a common effort to fight terrorism within the frame along with what we do to have the cooperation of combating terrorism with more than 40 nations, and that included all aspects in intelligence exchange, activities, and how best to combat and detour and rendition and to have bilateral meetings with those nations, and this theory that's been adopted by the yes , ma'amny -- yemen government comes along the understanding of terrorism, and today, it is not -- not a specific problem to nations, but it is rather international threat and on the political, social, economic levels. this will reflect the fears and realist threats provided by the ways and means of terrorists diversified and are transnational. there are blood and lives lost. we are still suffering from terrorism, and we paid a lot with blood and life and many of the public institutions and privately owned and it affected the tourism and now most of the hotels in
absolutely could really believe, that when you question someone's faith, it is more probing. religion, preference, some pain that goes you bought that? >> i have other channels, houseo senate plus authors, book reviews, speeches, those kinds of things. if i know that was coming up on the floor of the house, i watched, you know, which channel i want to see because i have them all. if there is either a speech you've covered for a book reviewer so on, i'm going to watch that. what i want to find out some thing that has some value to it, that is going to be one of the first places i look.@) i mean, i'm obviously a public rod casting fan. i watch those channels. out of a couple hundred channels they probably have five to 10 at the most that i'm going to go to, but it's going to include all the c-span channels. >> house democratic leaders held a press conference today at the u.s. capitol, urging house republicans to reconvene congress to complete its remaining legislative work. this news conference out of house democratic steering and policy committee on medicare. other topics of discussion
[inaudible] than religion, sexual preference, it's something that goes to the very [inaudible] you say you bought that? sixty minutes on the career at cbs. walt tear cron cite and journalism today. sunday at 8 on c-span q & a. >>> i have all the channels, 1992 senate plus author book review speeches, those kinds of things. if i know a bill is coming up on the floor of the house, i watch, you know, which channel i want to see.%h because i have them all. as a book review or someone i'm going to watch that. when i want to find out something that has that's going to be one of the places i look. i'm a public broadcasting fan. i watch the channels. out of a couple of hundred channels i probably have five to ten of the most he watches c-span on direct tv. created by the american cable company in 1979. brought to you as a public service by your television provider. middle income families would pay about $2,000 more in taxes next year if the so called fiscal cliff is allowed to happen in january. bush era tax cuts and the payroll tax holiday are scheduled to end. economist discuss the issue today.
in art, it is more personal, more probing than politics, religion, sexual preference. it is something that goes to the very soul when you say, you bought that? >> syrian opposition activist today predicted that the assad regime will fall by next summer. the u.s. institute posted the activists who are part of a group called the day after project. they presented a transition plan for syria which they say it started being used by the opposition areas no longer under assad's control. this is just under two hours. >> good morning ladies and gentlemen. i am jim marshall the new president of the institute of peace which i'm delighted to tell you and i'm also very pleased that everyone is here today for a very important, to hear about a very important projects sponsored by the institute of peace. my job principally is to introduce steve heideman. steve stevens or senior advisor for middle east initiatives. he has taught at columbia. he is extensively published, has also directed the center for democracy and civil studies and civil society at georgetown university. he is a terrific asset to th
, more probing than politics, religion, preference. it is just something that goes to the very soul. you bought that? r >> c-span gives a great inside look to what's happening in washington. whenever that happens, it will always come back to you and changes your view because it's different than regular media because it's very objective and it shows a lot of what is real and what is going on. i watched hearings on c-span and when the senate and house both on different bills, we watched them from the office and also come on the supreme court has hearings, we watched decisions and opinions. >> and a senate reelection bid this year, new jersey democrat, bob menendez faces a challenge from state senator joe kyrillos. the two met tonight at montclair state university. this comes from us, courtesy of transport. step two we welcome you to the first debate between the first two major candidates for the u.s. senate. u.s. senator bob menendez, democratic incumbent and his republican challenger, state senator joe kyrillos. questioning tonight, alfred doblin, the editorial editor of "the record and
, for probing than politics, religion, sexual preference. it's something that goes to the very soul when you say, you bought that? >> 60 minutes' morley safer on his career at cbs and journalism today. sunday at 8 on c-span's "q&a." >>> you're watching c-span2 with politics and public affairs. weekdays featuring live coverage of the u.s. senate. on weeknights watch key public policy events and every weekend the latest nonfiction authors and books on booktv. you can see past programs and get our schedule at our web site, and you can join in the conversation on social media sites. >> on november 8th china will have new communist party political leaders. former secretary of state henry kissinger and a former u.s. ambassador to china, stapleton, roy, talked about the upcoming congress in china and what the change means for u.s./china relations. this discussion was hosted by the wilson center in washington d.c. >> good afternoon. i'm jane harman, president and ceo of the wilson center. welcome to those in the audience as well as those tuning in via c-span and live webcast. it's great to see -- i'm lo
in art, it is more personal, mo prayer than in the politics, religion, preference. it is just something that goes to the very soul when you say, you bought that? >> this is the first parish church in new brunswick, maine. it is significant to the story of "uncle tom's cabin" that in many ways the story began here. it is here in this pew, pew number 23. teachers do, by her account, sought a vision of uncle tom being with to death. now, uncle tom is you probably know, is the title charactercome to hear of her 1852 novel, "uncle tom's cabin." "uncle tom's cabin" was written very much as a protest novel to the slave block of which mandated in 1850 that anyone in the north, where of the abolitionists live, if anyone in the northwest to aid or abet a fugitive slave, they themselves would be imprisoned or fined for breaking the law. and this was the bill that was seen as kind of a compromise between the north and south to avoid war. it said that was part of what the novel was trying to do, to say the same, i am a person can hear you beecher stowe, name against slavery as a much of new england.
question, focus on compromise. you know, science and ideology, science and religion will never come 100% together. we base everything on medical fact and on evidence-based medicine. first is a spirituality and ideology. it is my belief that there's room for compromise, that we can look toward improving health outcomes of communities like infant mortality rates. women, especially here in this county, we have a very large infant mortality rate issues, and one of the causes is sexually-transmitted infections. well, by stripping away 60 health centers that provoided testing and treatment -- provided testing and treatment, it's not going to help the infant mortality rates. and restricting women from accessing birth control is not going to prevent the need for abortion. >> you know, um, i'm sure that you cannot watch tv during the news hours for more than five minutes without seeing a viagra commercial -- [laughter] and young people don't watch tv -- [applause] so when you do, you hear all the risks. now, i'm wondering, are they going to stop providing viagra on these health plans -- start pr
that when you question someone's taste in art it's more personal than the politics, religion, sexual preference. it's something that goes to the very soul. officials from the u.s. and the u.k. recently discussed the challenges involved with tracking the makers and sellers of counterfeit prescription drugs. gerald is with the british agency and focuses on drug safety and says last year some 13,000 website were shut down after one operation targeting counterfeiters. this panel is part of a conference hosted by the conference for safe medicine. >> it's my great pleasure to welcome you all back to your chairs. my name is brian and i am the managing director of an organization here in washington called the simpson center, a private not-for-profit public policy think tank that works on and in a way transnational both health and security issues. based on the discussion of this for today, - get this -- is really struck me that fewer of the global issues indeed transnational issues that i work on cut across so many of the artificial boundaries that we have developed to organize ourselves in g
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